Economic Consequences of Fast Food Industry’s CEO-to-Worker Pay Disparity

Image by osiaffiliate.com/images/profit.jpg

 

If you thought that the low wages fast food workers are paid only affect workers, this article and the accompanying study shows that the issue of fair wages is one we must all take notice of.

From Demos.org:

From Davos to Wall Street to Main Street, there is a growing consensus that inequality slows economic recovery and dampens consumer demand.

New analysis of the CEO-to-worker compensation ratio across industries shows that Accommodation and Food Services is the most unequal sector in the economy, and that this extreme pay disparity is primarily driven by one of the sector’s component industries: fast food. The fast food industry is also one of the highest growth employers in the nation.

Accommodation and Food Services had a CEO-to-worker pay ratio of 543-to-1 in 2012. Over the period from 2000 to 2012 the average ratio was 332-to-1, 44 percent higher than the sector with the next-highest compensation ratio. In 2012, the compensation of fast food CEOs was more than 1,200 times the earnings of the average fast food worker. Proxy disclosures recently released by fast food companies reveal that the ratio remained above 1,000-to-1 in 2013.

Pay disparity in the fast food industry is a result of two factors: escalating payments to corporate CEOs and stagnant poverty-level wages received by typical workers in the industry.

  • Fast food CEOs are some of the highest paid workers in America. The average CEO at fast food companies earned $23.8 million in 2013, more than quadruple the average from 2000 in real terms.
  • Fast food workers are the lowest paid in the economy. The average hourly wage of fast food employees is $9.09, or less than $19,000 per year for a full-time worker, though most fast food workers do not get full-time hours. Their wages have increased just 0.3 percent in real dollars since 2000.

Income inequality is increasing legal, regulatory, and operating risks for fast food firms. Millions of dollars in legal fees, increasing customer wait times, and labor unrest are evidence of the systemic problems of income inequality in fast food.

Shareholders interested in the continued success of the fast food industry should be particularly attuned to these issues, since according to the industry leader inequality is already threatening the bottom line. Reducing the proportion of CEO-to-worker compensation by addressing bad practices on both halves of the ratio is one step toward realigning the interests of stakeholders in the firm, including shareholders, executives, and the workforce overall.

To read the full study, go Demos.org.

 

 

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Economic Consequences of Fast Food Industry’s CEO-to-Worker Pay Disparity

  1. 543-to-1. It smacks of oppression and servitude perpetrated by a callous and self-righteous aristocracy. Didn’t the American Revolution fight against that very thing? How ironic.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s